SFZF 2014 Panel: "RADICAL PARENTING" with Tomas Moniz, Artnoose, and Special Guests

Tomas Moniz (of Rad Dad) and Artnoose (of Ker-Bloom) publish stories about the ins and outs, highs and lows of parenting, because stories help make better parents. After all, parents need role models too. 

When life as a young rebel changes with the presence of a child, the rebellious spirit doesn’t die, it just evolves through parenthood. Tomas and Artnoose, and guests are here to talk about their experiences as artists and parents pushing for progress. 

Moderated by Tyler Cohen (of Primazonia). 

This panel takes place Saturday, August 30th from 3:30 to 4:30pm.

SF Zine Fest talks with Ellis Kim

In three sentences, tell us what your work is about.

For the past two years, I've been working on the first chapter of a comic idea that would wind up involving me hitchhiking across America, traveling from San Francisco to Miami Beach, Oklahoma City to Chicago, and back home, just so that I might have better source material to write from. Time Fiddler is a comic about a girl who stumbles into the world of time-travelers, starring Sam Fiddler, an ordinary teenage girl who just graduated high school. Having difficulty getting a job and feeling lonely in life, she's suddenly thrust into a wildly different world from her own, finding she's landed in late-Cretaceous California. 

How did you first find out about zines? What inspired you to make your own zines?

I first came across zines when a friend suggested I go attend the Oakland Art Murmur, back in 2007-2009 or so. I've held more recent interest in the zine-scene due to its hand-made, auteuristic, and principal nature over other mediums.

What do you do when you’re not creating?

I enjoy walking a lot, exploring and talking to new people. Presently, though, I'm stuck at home trying to get ready for SF Zinefest and so I wind up wasting precious time watching YouTube. I want to play more videogames, though; my heart's in games. In other words, I'm fun-employed/a freelancer.

What is an unexpected benefit that you’ve experienced from reading/ making zines?

Learning the value of expedience in the time it takes to work on page or a batch of pages, planning, all sorts of stuff regarding time spent vs how long things take to make.

How would you advise first timers on making their first zines?

Make something that you'd be interested in reading; don't worry about other people's interests, where the "market" is moving, or what other people do. Just do what you do, and learn from yourself and others about how to make it more awesome the next time.

What are you working on for this year’s SF Zine Fest?

I'm currently finishing up the last few pages of the first chapter of my comic, Time Fiddler. I'm looking forward to how people will react to it. I don't think I'll have enough time to put in word bubbles and a proper script that I like in time for printing and shipping, but the pictures hopefully convey the movement and motion that happens from page to page.

For more from Ellis, check out:

http://tumblr.com/hehashivemind

http://www.timefiddler.com

Twitter/Instagram: @TimeFiddler

 

SF Zine Fest talks with Amy Berkowitz of Mondo Bummer

In three sentences, tell us what your work is about.

Mondo Bummer publishes poetry (and sometimes prose, fiction, and plays) in a disappointing way. It's not exactly a zine, it's more of a chapbook press with a DIY / punk / minimalist aesthetic. Mondo Bummer is interested in making brief poetry books you can wipe your greasy pizza hands on and not feel guilty about it.

How did you first find out about zines? What inspired you to make your own zines?

The first time I saw hand-bound, homemade poetry chaps was at Unnameable Books in Brooklyn. I was 22, I think, and I asked Adam, who owns the store, if he would carry a chapbook of my poems if I made one. He said sure, and his sister, who happened to be hanging out with him that day, explained what a pamphlet stitch was. That was all I needed. I went home, made my book, and then got excited about publishing other people's writing.

What do you do when you’re not creating?

I take long walks (I got very lost in Mount Sutro Forest last weekend), I bake things (I'm exploring my cultural heritage with a Hungarian baking period at the moment), I travel to Oakland a lot (to see friends and go to poetry readings), I work as a freelance writer (and also a writing tutor), I am pleasantly surprised whenever something interesting happens in San Francisco (like I just found out there is an art gallery in a garage up the street from my house), and I host a monthly reading series at my apartment (to prove to myself and others that interesting things still go on in San Francisco).

What is an unexpected benefit that you’ve experienced from reading/ making zines?

Getting weird shit in the mail. From the beginning, I welcomed barter as payment for Mondo Bummer books (I think "barter welcome" is followed with 10 exclamation points on the website). And I am so glad I did. From noise cassettes to poetry books to collages to a Blockbuster Video membership card belonging to EAT, MY FUCKING ASS, it's been a cornucopia of riches.

How would you advise first timers on making their first zines?

Have fun and don't be afraid of failure.

What are you working on for this year’s SF Zine Fest?

Well, in addition to the Classic Bummers, which are just poems printed out on regular paper, corner stapled, and then folded like letters, we're also working on some books that have a more complex aesthetic. Right now, I have a bag of alpaca wool on my desk, and I can't wait to start production of Jennifer Marie Hoff's NZ Is Terrible. The chapbook is a series of surreal dispatches from a lousy trip to a New Zealand alpaca farm, and we're going to bind it with yarn from Hoff's travels. 

For more from Amy, check out:

http://www.mondobummer.com/

SF Zine Fest talks with Andrew Pannell

In three sentences, tell us what your work is about.

I draw scratchy, sad-fantasy comics. I’m currently making a series about my hometown, doom, and acceptance called Nowhere, CA.  And I play music in a band named after a Jules Feiffer character.

How did you first find out about zines? What inspired you to make your own zines?

I lived in a place where the closest comic book shop was half an hour away, and only had super heroes and board game, so I ended up finding zines and “alt”-comics on the internet when i was 17 or so. I always liked telling stories and drawing slimy monsters and one day decided I could do both.

What do you do when you’re not creating?

Watching anime, riding my bike, and teaching art at after school programs for elementary school kids!

What is an unexpected benefit that you’ve experienced from reading/ making zines?

Crafting an object and bringing it into the world makes me feel like a magician, you know? That magic gives me the power to keep moving.

How would you advise first timers on making their first zines?

Realize that you’re the most powerful Creator-Creature that lives inside Your Body! Your destiny is to write and draw cool shit and trade them with like-minded Creator-Creatures at the nearest Zine Fest!

What are you working on for this year’s SF Zine Fest?
Nowhere, CA. Episode 1.1 (Wizerds) in which 10 year-old Salvador and Joe play wizards in the woods and see some kinda scary stuff they don’t quite understand.

For more from Andrew, check out:

http://andpan.tumblr.com/