SF Zine Fest talks with Christina Douk

In three sentences, tell us what your work is about.

I enjoy recreating scenes using my childhood imagination. I like to play around with whimsical ideas and make the impossible believable. My visionary goal is to always tell a story that will leave a smile on your face.

How did you first find out about zines? What inspired you to make your own zines?

I found out about this event from  a friend. I am new to this part of the industry, I enjoy creating  series of pieces that when put together will tell my story as well as who I am as an artist.

What do you do when you’re not creating?

Sleeping, gaming, and searching for new inspiration. 

What is an unexpected benefit that you’ve experienced from reading/ making zines?

I enjoy the break away from the busy work life. Although I am still technically doing work, its nice to conceptualize something that I want to do for myself than for a client. It is like taking a mini creative vacation. 

How would you advise first timers on making their first zines?

Creating a new piece is very daunting at first glance. Gather, references, references,  and references! You seriously can never have enough. Ideas usually originate from somewhere, and its best to find as much inspiration as you can before beginning. Figure out the style, the look and plan out how you think you want to go about it. 

What are you working on for this year’s SF Zine Fest?

I created a new series for this event called "Imagine". It plays on the idea of childhood imaginations, where we as kids believe that the world around us is what we make it to be. The illusion that we can change any location to be whatever we want and we can be whoever we want.

For more from Christina, check out:

http://doukie.daportfolio.com/

SF Zine Fest talks with EmmaKarin Eriksson

In three sentences, tell us what your work is about.

Spreading the good word that washing dishes and scrubbing floors isn't a capitalist scheme by the patriarchy! I write about my love life/sexual life/sex work experiences as a way to shatter the idea that publicizing consensual sex is gross/dirty/pornography. My writing is meant to be cathartic and informative for me and the reader, meant to get people thinking, talking and doing.

How did you first find out about zines? What inspired you to make your own zines?

I honestly cannot remember how I found out about zines! How terrible huh? I made my first zine called, "We Got The Beet!" (I still have copies!) with two friends so we could have something cool to sell next to my buttons at a local punk show.

What do you do when you’re not creating?

Right now my time is divided between tending to my garden, wandering around the woods looking for dead stuff in the country, running Sidelines at Bluestockings Radical Bookstore in the city, hilarious and trying sex work adventures, perfecting my nail art abilities and saving up my pennies to attend Library School!

What is an unexpected benefit that you’ve experienced from reading/ making zines?

The unmistakeable feeling of being closer to people I might not ever know or meet. When you make or read a zine you hold in your hands a tangible piece of DIY ethic that contains bits of experience and knowledge from a real person. Reading and making zines is community building. You build community by encouraging and by being pro-active in an exchange of ideas and information. I have benefited directly from making zines in that I feel heard. I feel I am adding to a conversation within my community of radical weirdos who like doing things the old fashioned way.

How would you advise first timers on making their first zines?

Don't forget to edit! You don't need to put everything into that first issue. Before xeroxing or printing double check for spelling errors! Also make sure to keep at least an 1/4in border on all your pages. Most copiers/printers will cut into the page!

What are you working on for this year’s SF Zine Fest?

I am in the process of writing Radical Domesticity #4 and Hang Ups and Hard Work #3 is waiting to be folded and stapled! RD 4 is all Fall/Winter related stuff like stew recipes, leaf identification and how to prep your place for bad weather! Hang Ups 3 is mostly about my experiences as a sex worker. My favorite piece in it is my etiquette guide on how to treat a sex worker whether you are a client or a partner/friend!

SF Zine Fest taks with Edana Contreras

In three sentences, tell us what your work is about.

I made a zine about a superhero (Earl Grey) whose powers include spraying his nemeses with boiling hot tea. This volume covers his origin story.

How did you first find out about zines? What inspired you to make your own zines?

I had the idea to write a comic book, but I didn’t have the means and time to do an official comic book. Therefore, I adjusted my plan to compose a zine without images. However, I wanted a very thoroughly plotted out story.

What do you do when you’re not creating?

I work on documentary projects.

What is an unexpected benefit that you’ve experienced from reading/ making zines?

I think I can understand better how to create complex characters than before.

How would you advise first timers on making their first zines?

My advice is to choose something that is interesting to you, some grain of that idea can be sprouted out into a story.