SF Zine Fest talks with Anthea from Spoonfulzine

In three sentences, tell us what your work is about.

Spoonful is a short and inspiring little publication which, in light of our insanely busy lives and increasing 'oh no, I must find time to read x' can be finished by the end of a train ride. It's quick to consume, beautifully soft, & after reading will genuinely make you smile.

How did you first find out about zines? What inspired you to make your own zines?

I wanted to publish something short and was hatching the idea when I attended a zine fair back in Australia... I thought the zine would be the perfect flexible format to house my project of passion :)

What do you do when you’re not creating?

I am a graphic designer, teacher of design & full-time Mom to a little girl - the last being the REAL hard work, hehe.

What is an unexpected benefit that you've experienced from reading/ making zines?

Friends and generally awesome people! Spoonful has created a amazing space to meet and work with amazing new writers, artists and fellow creatives. I've made some really lovely and dear friends all over the world working on putting each issue together. I feel very lucky actually ;)

How would you advise first timers on making their first zines?

Just go for it. Make it filled with your passions & interests and like-minded folk will tune in.

What are you working on for this year’s SF Zine Fest?

The latest issue is all about sweetness... in a physical & metaphorical sense. This will be my first SF zine fest as I'm from Australia so I'm really looking forward to seeing the 'scene' here and hopefully meeting some friendly faces :)

For more from Anthea, check out:

http://www.spoonfulzine.com/
www.facebook.com/Spoonfulzine
https://twitter.com/Spoonfulzine

 

SF Zine Fest talks with Teddy Hose

In three sentences, tell us what your work is about.

Oscillating Profundities is a satirical webcomic exhibiting socio-economic clash, dark, gut level humor, pop culture and general nerdery in a designer, minimalist visual style. My current set of zines include the topics of race, dating, and life as a designer. My other available risograph prints have been featured as webcomics in Huffington Post, Laughing Squid, Mashable, and MissionMission.

How did you first find out about zines? What inspired you to make your own zines?

I first noticed zines floating around during the third wave of punk in the late 90s. As an active fan of lowbrow art, I love that zines are easily made and sold as unpolished art for the rest of us. I made zines because I wanted to table at indie comic cons with printed work, and thought the controversial themes I sometimes exhibit fit the part.

What do you do when you’re not creating?

I absolutely love and strive to be like artists known to use a variety of mediums, whose style and themes speak louder than the expertise of their craft. Lately I've had my head in comedy with making video shorts, animating, and writing which saw publishing in McSweeney's. I also play guitar and have been in several bands over the years, most recently San Francisco act Genevapop.

What is an unexpected benefit that you've experienced from reading/ making zines?

Most zines I saw at first were more abstract and/or counter-culture, but lately I've come across more with humor and personal stories. They're all great but I love seeing work from self-aware artists, who don't take themselves too seriously. Some zines are surprisingly intimate too, which really spoke to how far I could go with mine.

How would you advise first timers on making their first zines?

I like the texture of risograph prints and use Berkeley studio, Tiny Splendor to print mine. They are relatively cheap to produce and are a step up from your standard Xerox print, so I recommend it.

What are you working on for this year’s SF Zine Fest?

I'm turning one of my webcomics that went viral this year into a print; "Doing Bald Right", a chart of style options for balding men (something for the helplessly bald dudes out there like myself). I'm also making a zine on the stress of paying for my own art school education, in New York City. Most of my proceeds from SF Zinefest will go to Sallie Mae and burritos.

For more from Teddy Hose, check out:

www.oscillatingprofundities.com

@OscillatingProf

oscillatingprofundities.tumblr.com/

SF Zine Fest talks with Tyler Spangler

 

In three sentences, tell us what your work is about.

Tyler Spangler’s work focuses on the formalist relationship between images removed from their original context. He explores the connotations of color, form, and photography through the medium of digital collage. His work is about filtering beauty, confusion, and inquiry from the human condition.

How did you first find out about zines? What inspired you to make your own zines?

I saw my first zine online. I was in high school and I was checking out old punk flyers and came across old fanzines that someone uploaded. I was fascinated. It helped me realize that spreading ideas through zines is a really amazing thing. They disregard bureaucratic roadblocks and allow ideas to flow fast, cheap, and efficiently. It is a true medium of the people. 

What do you do when you’re not creating?

I like to surf, cook, and road trip. All of these influence my process. 

What is an unexpected benefit that you've experienced from reading/ making zines?

Self publishing is very empowering. To have an idea go from your brain to a physical entity and into the world is really magical. Once you self publish your first zine, you begin to realize your ability to contribute and influence other people. You go from an observer, a consumer, to a producer. 

How would you advise first timers on making their first zines?

Just be completely honest. No idea is stupid. Create it and out it out there and see how people react. Its the best way to learn and grow. Above all, create like a crazy person. Lock yourself in a room and wring out every last drop of ideas. No one has your experience and point of view. 

What are you working on for this year’s SF Zine Fest?

I have collaborated with Situationist writer Isaac Cronin with whom I met at last years zine fest. We are making a book called Dictionary of Unhappiness. It is a 90 page color paperback of 40 definitions accompanied by 40 illustrations. I will be selling this book along with 10 different prints. Of course I will have a bowl of candy for everyone again! I want my table to be a kaleidoscope of blinding color.