SF Zine Fest talks with Max Stadnik of Tiny Splendor

In three sentences, tell us what your work is about.

Our work is often humorous, dark, and/or psychedelic - we strive to keep it diverse and fresh all of the time. We want to bring work to the scene that is unexpected. But at our core we endeavor for accessibility, affordability, and a high level of quality.

How did you first find out about zines? What inspired you to make your own zines?

It is honestly hard to remember the first time I found a zine or thought about what it was. I think that coming from a background in traditional printmaking, getting into zines was really natural. It is a great medium for getting your work out into the world. It is powerful in that way, because you are suddenly freed from having to rely on institutions and the interests of others when it comes to self-publishing. And in this sense the zine embodies a certain honesty and rawness that is often lacking not only in the world of traditional publishing but the art world in general.

What do you do when you’re not creating?

The four of us all work various jobs, but for the most part they are in creative fields. If it is not creating for ourselves, it is usually helping others get their projects out into the world. At this point there is very little down time, but when I am trying to get away and relax it is nice to cook a good meal and listen to records.

What is an unexpected benefit that you’ve experienced from reading/ making zines?

There really have been too many unforeseen benefits that have come from getting involved in the zine world to list here. But what comes to my mind first is discovering the RISOGRAPH. After making zines, prints, patches, and pins for a long time, we eventually saved up enough money to invest in our own RISO, which has changed all of our lives. This machine has really allowed us to work on a level that none of us foresaw. It truly is a dream machine.

How would you advise first timers on making their first zines?

Most importantly, have fun. Keep the concept simple and just get it done, get it into the world, and get on to making your next one. All the lessons you need to learn you will learn through repetition and making hard mistakes - this is important! Don’t be discouraged. It is best to start small and build yourself up, keep it simple and cheap.

What are you working on for this year’s SF Zine Fest?

We have quite a few projects we are trying to complete—whether they get done or not we shall see. But for the zine fest we will be debuting a new zine by Daniel Shimoda entitled “Sunless” showcasing a series of new drawings. We will also be debuting a new zine by Maren Preston called “Los Dos,” a personal look at Argentina and Bolivia through original artworks. Also in the works is a collaborative zine between myself and Sanaa Khan entitled PSYCHOZICS – a psychedelic fusion of fetish and supernatural, from the occult to the bizarre   for adult readers only…keep your eyes out for it – coming soon!

For more from Tiny Splendor, check out:

http://tinysplendor.com

SF Zine Fest talks with Colin Andersen

In three sentences, tell us what your work is about.

My art is about the badassness of using line and color to manipulate narrative subject matter. Being able to play with a viewers line of sight and expectations whether it be in comic, Illustration or in printmaking is what really gets me excited to work on a piece. I primarily work in pen and ink with fucked up brushes I take a razor blade on and then digitally color my drawings.

How did you first find out about zines? What inspired you to make your own zines?

I really found out about zines when I went to APE for the first time and would see all these amazing zines made by local artists. It made me realize that you didn't have to wait for a publisher to pick you up, you could just make a little zine and put it out DIY style.

What do you do when you’re not creating?

I ride my bike and explore different parts of the Bay that I've not been to before.

What is an unexpected benefit that you've experienced from reading/ making zines?

Reading zines I've realized there is a whole creative community that is really supportive of simply making stuff for the sake of making stuff. Making zines has made me realize how much I need a saddle stitch stapler so I don't have to go into the print shop down the street every other weekend and borrow theirs.

How would you advise first timers on making their first zines?

Well apart from figuring out what kind of zine you want to make; Comics, Art, Punk, Writing, ect. I'd learn Adobe Indesign. It makes things faster and lets you take risks with different formats.

What are you working on for this year’s SF Zine Fest?

This Zine Fest I'll be premiering three Brand New Zines! Chapter two of my on going comic series Street Justice, a collection of my short comics and a free zine about the History Of Riot GRRRL! You can check out a preview of Street Justice Chapter 2 and the full version of A Brief History Of Riot GRRRL on my websites' blog.

For more from Colin, check out:

http://theecolinandersen.com/

SF Zine Fest talks with Anthea from Spoonfulzine

In three sentences, tell us what your work is about.

Spoonful is a short and inspiring little publication which, in light of our insanely busy lives and increasing 'oh no, I must find time to read x' can be finished by the end of a train ride. It's quick to consume, beautifully soft, & after reading will genuinely make you smile.

How did you first find out about zines? What inspired you to make your own zines?

I wanted to publish something short and was hatching the idea when I attended a zine fair back in Australia... I thought the zine would be the perfect flexible format to house my project of passion :)

What do you do when you’re not creating?

I am a graphic designer, teacher of design & full-time Mom to a little girl - the last being the REAL hard work, hehe.

What is an unexpected benefit that you've experienced from reading/ making zines?

Friends and generally awesome people! Spoonful has created a amazing space to meet and work with amazing new writers, artists and fellow creatives. I've made some really lovely and dear friends all over the world working on putting each issue together. I feel very lucky actually ;)

How would you advise first timers on making their first zines?

Just go for it. Make it filled with your passions & interests and like-minded folk will tune in.

What are you working on for this year’s SF Zine Fest?

The latest issue is all about sweetness... in a physical & metaphorical sense. This will be my first SF zine fest as I'm from Australia so I'm really looking forward to seeing the 'scene' here and hopefully meeting some friendly faces :)

For more from Anthea, check out:

http://www.spoonfulzine.com/
www.facebook.com/Spoonfulzine
https://twitter.com/Spoonfulzine

 

SF Zine Fest talks with Teddy Hose

In three sentences, tell us what your work is about.

Oscillating Profundities is a satirical webcomic exhibiting socio-economic clash, dark, gut level humor, pop culture and general nerdery in a designer, minimalist visual style. My current set of zines include the topics of race, dating, and life as a designer. My other available risograph prints have been featured as webcomics in Huffington Post, Laughing Squid, Mashable, and MissionMission.

How did you first find out about zines? What inspired you to make your own zines?

I first noticed zines floating around during the third wave of punk in the late 90s. As an active fan of lowbrow art, I love that zines are easily made and sold as unpolished art for the rest of us. I made zines because I wanted to table at indie comic cons with printed work, and thought the controversial themes I sometimes exhibit fit the part.

What do you do when you’re not creating?

I absolutely love and strive to be like artists known to use a variety of mediums, whose style and themes speak louder than the expertise of their craft. Lately I've had my head in comedy with making video shorts, animating, and writing which saw publishing in McSweeney's. I also play guitar and have been in several bands over the years, most recently San Francisco act Genevapop.

What is an unexpected benefit that you've experienced from reading/ making zines?

Most zines I saw at first were more abstract and/or counter-culture, but lately I've come across more with humor and personal stories. They're all great but I love seeing work from self-aware artists, who don't take themselves too seriously. Some zines are surprisingly intimate too, which really spoke to how far I could go with mine.

How would you advise first timers on making their first zines?

I like the texture of risograph prints and use Berkeley studio, Tiny Splendor to print mine. They are relatively cheap to produce and are a step up from your standard Xerox print, so I recommend it.

What are you working on for this year’s SF Zine Fest?

I'm turning one of my webcomics that went viral this year into a print; "Doing Bald Right", a chart of style options for balding men (something for the helplessly bald dudes out there like myself). I'm also making a zine on the stress of paying for my own art school education, in New York City. Most of my proceeds from SF Zinefest will go to Sallie Mae and burritos.

For more from Teddy Hose, check out:

www.oscillatingprofundities.com

@OscillatingProf

oscillatingprofundities.tumblr.com/